Sustainable Transport Coalition of Western Australia ASPO AUSTRALIA
Home arrow Seminars arrow Past Events arrow Ship emissions seen causing 60,000 deaths a year
Monday, 02 March 2015
 
 
Ship emissions seen causing 60,000 deaths a year Print

Reuters, 7 November 2007

Emissions from ocean-going ships are responsible for about 60,000 deaths a year from heart and lung-related cancers, according to research published on Wednesday that calls for tougher fuel standards.

Shanghai, Singapore and Hong Kong, three of the world's five busiest ports, were likely to suffer disproportionate impacts from ship-related emissions, said the study, published in Environmental Science and Technology, a journal of the American Chemical Society.

"For a long time there's been this perception that ship emissions are out there in the ocean and they don't really affect anyone on land and I think this study shows that this is clearly false," said David Marshall, senior counsel at the Boston-based Clean Air Task Force, which co-commissioned the study.

"They do matter and they do need to be controlled."

Scientists said the fact that shipping takes place on the high seas -- away from populations who can readily see impacts of emissions -- was part of the reason the industry's fuel standards lagged those of the auto industry.

But sulfur emissions from international shipping represent about 8 percent of sulfur emissions from all fossil fuels, said James Corbett, one of the authors of the study.

Most ships run on bunker fuel, which is cheaper than distillate, but also more polluting. Corbett said it was also getting dirtier over time as distillate fuels become cleaner, since the sulfur driven out of distillates ends up in the residuals used by ships.

"The international treaty process at the IMO (International Maritime Organization) has been a slow process by which consensus is reached, rather than a process by which a regulatory authority can set standards that an industry must agree to," he said. 

Shanghai, Singapore and Hong Kong, three of the world's five busiest ports, were likely to suffer disproportionate impacts from ship-related emissions, said the study, published in Environmental Science and Technology, a journal of the American Chemical Society.

"For a long time there's been this perception that ship emissions are out there in the ocean and they don't really affect anyone on land and I think this study shows that this is clearly false," said David Marshall, senior counsel at the Boston-based Clean Air Task Force, which co-commissioned the study.

"They do matter and they do need to be controlled."

Scientists said the fact that shipping takes place on the high seas -- away from populations who can readily see impacts of emissions -- was part of the reason the industry's fuel standards lagged those of the auto industry.

But sulfur emissions from international shipping represent about 8 percent of sulfur emissions from all fossil fuels, said James Corbett, one of the authors of the study.

Most ships run on bunker fuel, which is cheaper than distillate, but also more polluting. Corbett said it was also getting dirtier over time as distillate fuels become cleaner, since the sulfur driven out of distillates ends up in the residuals used by ships.

"The international treaty process at the IMO (International Maritime Organization) has been a slow process by which consensus is reached, rather than a process by which a regulatory authority can set standards that an industry must agree to," he said. 

http://uk.reuters.com/article/environmentNews/idUKPEK34163320071107

 
< Prev   Next >
Donate to STCWA
Make payments with PayPal
Latest News
QUT researcher takes out aviation award

Brisbane Times, 25 February 2015

A Queensland researcher has taken home a huge gong at the Australian International Airshow and Aerospace and Defence Exposition in Victoria with a compound that detects potentially catastrophic paint deterioration.

Read more...
Was MH3702s flight south ‘spoofed’ as it really flew north?

Crikey, 24 February 2015

One of the most careful dissenting voices in the MH370 mystery is US science writer Jeff Wise, who has today published a study of tractor work on a patch of earth in Kazakhstan that matches the dimensions of the missing ...

Read more...
Why Do Many Reasonable People Doubt Science?

National Geographic, March 2015

We live in an age when all manner of scientific knowledge—from climate change to vaccinations—faces furious opposition.
Some even have doubts about the moon landing.

Read more...
Archives
Login Form





Lost Password?
 
This is my Google PageRank™ - SmE Rank free service Powered by Scriptme
 
Top! Top!